Kate Whitman | Episode 29

Atlanta’s literary community never has a shortage of events happening, but sometimes it can be hard to keep up with all of them. We try to bridge that gap where we can with our Events page (it’s up to the top…just click and see), but we also want to highlight those that put on these events to make sure you don't miss out on any of them.

Helmed by Kate Whitman, the Atlanta History Center’s Author Series brings in writers for readings with Q&A’s regularly, like a few a week. That’s a lot of authors and it takes a lot of work and care to make happen. So we thought it would be great to sit and get to know Kate and find out what's going on over at The Atlanta History Center.

We have a great conversation about how she books these events, but also we address the topic of Unsolved Mysteries being the original true crime obsession, how the book business isn’t going anywhere, and in typical fashion end up in the weeds of existential meaning of existence.

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Kate Whitman is VP of Public Programs for the Atlanta History Center and its Midtown campus, the Margaret Mitchell House and oversees all programming for both sites. Her current duties include overseeing a program staff of 18 employees, strategic planning and grant writing for the programs division, developing immersive and engaging experiences for visitors of all ages, and supporting staff development through integrating dialogic engagement strategies. Whitman also curates the popular Author Program series, which welcomes over 50 bestselling authors to Atlanta each year.

Conversation topics included:

  • Gone with the Wind being the most popular book besides the Bible
  • High Fidelity the movie and “the guy”
  • Giving up being the High Fidelity guy
  • Did Mr. Belvedere have a very special episode about AIDS? (Yes, it was real)
  • Is Tom Hanks the Golden State Killer?
  • I'll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara

We hope you enjoy the episode and make sure to keep up with the Atlanta History Center through all of the ways.